Melpomene | the greek muse of tragedy

Melpomene is the greek muse of tragedy.

Melpomene Gustave MoreauGustave Moreau, Hésiode et la Muse, 1891, Musée d’Orsay

https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficheiro:Moreau,_Gustave_-_H%C3%A9siode_et_la_Muse_-_1891.jpg

Melpómene: the Tragedy

The one that is melodious

Despite her cheerful singing, she sings tragedy

Represented with a tragic mask, leather boots and knife or stick in hand

With a cypress crown

Roman statue of Melpomene, 2nd century AD. The muse is shown in a long-sleeved garment with a high belt, clothing that was associated with tragic actors.

Melpomene web

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melpomene#/media/File:Ny_Carlsberg_Glyptothek_-_Melpomene.jpg

The Muses

The ancient Greeks believed that their work was inspired and helped directly by the Muse of the art in which they fit.

For this reason, all epic poems, for example, typically begin with a request from the author to the muse Calliope, so that she inspires him.

From the from the relationship of Mnemósine with Zeus the Muses were born: Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polymnia, Terpsichore, Talia and Urania.

Initially, the muses were created to celebrate the victory of the gods over the Titans, in the so-called Titanomachy.

Considered deities of spring, over time their importance increased until they became goddesses – and responsible for human inspiration.

Museum

Museum, from the Greek Moiseum, means Temple of the Muses, and in Alexandria, already in antiquity, this designation was used for places that served to the study of the art and the sciences, fields connected to these mythological beings.

The Muses inspired the names of the museums, but do you know who these creatures were?

They are nine muses and each one is linked to some scientific or artistic component.

They are: Calliope, muse of eloquence and heroic poetry; Clio, muse of history; Érato, muse of lyric and erotic poetry; Euterpe, muse of music; Melpomene, muse of tragedy; Polymnia, muse of sacred poetry; Terpsichore, muse of dance; Talia, muse of comedy and festivity and Urania, muse of astronomy.


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